Why WE Follow Best Practices

Audiology of Nassau County adheres to Best Practices
Audiology of Nassau County adheres to Best Practices

The landscape for hearing health care has changed dramatically over the past 35 years. This ever evolving profession has undergone legislative changes that prior to 1978 would not permit qualified audiologists to fit hearing aids for their patients, to laws, decades later, requiring that all audiologists entering the field hold a doctorate degree.  And while the profession has seen many positive changes that have augmented the professional scope of the practitioner resulting in better hearing and improved lifestyle for more patients, there is also a vagueness regarding hearing care standards that baffle both patients and some physicians.

One possible explanation for the confusion about hearing care and hearing health is a general lack of awareness about the auditory system, its effect on cerebral health, and the role of amplification and aural rehabilitation in the care of hearing impaired patients.  Another explanation for general befuddlement is the seeming overabundance of hearing care facilities.  Many facilities run aggressive advertisement campaigns that focus on “selling” and of course “discounting” hearing aids.  Sorting through the confusion of big box store proclamations, marketing gimmicks (see post Marketing Predators: The EAR-ie Truth), and too often hurried fittings by some audiologists both in private practice and those employed by otologists, often leaves patients vulnerable to making decisions that may not have the best outcomes for their hearing rehabilitation.

Hearing aids are prescribed to improve communication, increase brain stimulation and overall to improve quality of life. Yet, often hearing aids are not appropriately fit, verified nor measured for their success, nor accompanied by a systematic process to ensure that the fitting goals are met.  This logically can affect not only the patient’s satisfaction with the instruments, but with the quality of life improvement as well. It is therefore of critical importance that patients, and families who are ready to begin the journey toward better hearing, understand that there are industry standards in place to ensure best outcome.  These standards are called best practices, and by following best practices, there is a system available to ensure best outcomes both from an acoustic perspective but also from a quality of life perspective.

A recent article by Sergei Kochkin published earlier this year by the Hearing Review compares outcomes for hearing aids purchased by users through direct-mail hearing aids and those who opted for a more traditional route. The results indicate that patients are “significantly more satisfied if all best practices are employed by the hearing professional in the clinic or office. Satisfaction from direct-mail purchases exceeds that from offices where best practices are not followed.”  This study and others similar, and the organizations that guide our profession outline and emphasize the importance of the use of best practices as a tool to provide best care for patients.

For patients and their families looking for hearing care and for physicians seeking the best referrals for their patients, best practices format makes it easy. It demystifies so much of the hearing care process.  Indeed, hearing health care is a process, not a device.  Educate yourself, your patients, and your loved ones about the standards that should be expected for best hearing outcomes.

Download our best practices “shopping guide” (available soon) on our website that can be used to compare process and procedures from one facility to another.  Best practices are the gold standard for hearing health care and regardless of the location, these methods should be applied. The savvy patient will use this guide as a tool, and ask targeted questions when interviewing a practitioner. Better hearing health begins with knowledge. The power is yours.

Hears to better hearing and better health!

Stefanie Wolf, Au.D.

 

Doctor of Audiology

Audiology of Nassau County

165 North Village Avenue

Suite #114

Rockville Centre, NY 11570

(516) 764-2094

www.audiologyofnassau.com

 

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How to Select a Hearing Health Care Provider

female_audiologist_postcard-r2147302d1ca64d8bbfec49ea325d8ed6_vgbaq_8byvr_324You’ve finally decided to move ahead and try to improve your communication skills. You’re excited about wearing hearing aids but don’t know how to get started. Choosing an appropriate hearing health care provider is as important as your choice of physician. Your audiologist is the hearing professional trained to evaluate and manage your hearing disorders and your concerns….so where to begin????

While a recommendation is very useful, it’s important to understand that one person’s success may not translate into success for you. Each person’s hearing loss is different and requires individual attention, not only to your hearing disorder, but to your lifestyle and your hearing requirements. Your doctor may have the names of qualified audiologists and this may be a good place to start. Asking a friend or relative is also helpful in terms of knowing the style and personality of the practice.

1. Choose a practice that adheres to the industry’s standards of “best practice”

2. Choose a practice where you will be seen by the same individual practitioner so there is continuity of service

3. Choose a practice that is not corporate in design so that decisions can be made by the audiologist managing your needs, and not by corporate protocols

4. Choose an audiologist who will listen to your needs and your concerns

5. Choose an audiologist who has state of the art equipment

6. Choose an audiologist who adheres to infection control recommendations, using disposable items when indicated

7. Choose an audiologist who is willing to make changes and corrections to the recommended hearing aid if it is not satisfactory

8. Choose an audiologist who takes the time to survey your hearing problems before you make hearing aid decisions

9. Choose an audiologist who offers many manufacturers’ brands of hearing aids

10. Choose an audiologist who incorporates multiple follow up appointments in order to assure your success

11. Choose an audiologist with appropriate university degrees

12. Choose an audiologist who has outcome measures to validate the hearing aid fitting

13. Choose an audiologist who is state licensed and abides by the state rules and regulations, and explains the state’s law for the trial period.

14. Choose an audiologist with a helpful staff for making insurance claims and answering questions

15. Choose an audiologist who will forward reports to your primary care physician

16. Choose an audiologist who will refer you to an otologist if your tests indicate the need for medical intervention

17. Choose an audiologist who you LIKE…you will be spending hours with this person which makes it even more important to put your trust and your confidence in a professional who is pleasant and accommodating and makes you feel relaxed and comfortable.

When it comes to your hearing, which is an integral component of your overall health, choose a hearing care professional who is patient and caring and provides counseling and aural rehabilitation to facilitate the adjustment to hearing instruments. Hearing aids are a process, not a product, and the relationship you build with your audiologist should be meaningful and built on a foundation of trust.

Hears to happy hearing and healthy living!

Stefanie Wolf, Au.D.
Doctor of Audiology
Audiology of Nassau County
165 North Village Avenue
Suite #114
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 764-2094

Hearing for the holidays and life

family-meal-free-clip-artIt’s that time of year once again. The days are shorter, the air is colder, we shop too much, we eat too much, and we make plans for more. For most of us the best part of the season aside from the delightful treats and seeing little ones open their presents, is reconnecting with family and friends. Gathering around a table or a fireplace reminiscing, recollecting and sharing is what the holidays are all about.

Yet, for the 48 million Americans that have some degree of hearing loss, the holidays may be a time of great struggle. For those with untreated hearing loss, get togethers with friends, family and colleagues in noisy party settings is often stressful and uncomfortable. Conversation connects us with people and even a mild hearing loss affects the ability to converse in the presence of background noise.

Untreated hearing loss can also lead to social isolation and depression. People decline invitations because they feel like they can’t participate in conversation in a meaningful way. Many feel that they look “stupid” if they can’t properly answer a question (it’s difficult to answer a question that you can’t hear). Depression can result from prolonged isolation.

Many are in denial about their hearing loss, often because it is a gradual process and are truly unaware that there is a problem. Others are concerned that admitting to a hearing loss will make them look “old.” The alternative, which is suffering in silence as the world whirls about is it really is painful for the person with hearing loss and their loved ones.

The silver lining is that hearing aids DO HELP. Most hearing losses can be assisted with hearing aids that are discrete and have a remarkable ability to process sound clearly and naturally. Don’t spend another holiday season in silence. Motivate yourself or your loved ones to have a hearing evaluation. There is little more precious in life than enjoying the company of those we care about. Make the most out of your time together. Hearing enables us to connect and is too precious a sense to be ignored.

Take care of your health, hearing and enjoy the spirit and sounds of the holiday season!

Stefanie Wolf, Au.D.
Doctor of Audiology
Audiology of Nassau County
165 North Village Avenue
Suite #114
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 764-2094

I Can Hear but I Can’t Understand

images (1)The auditory mechanism is an astoundingly complex and brilliant design. It is truly amazing how sound waves or vibrations in the air, initiate a chain reaction that starts with vibrations to the eardrum and concludes with a neural signal to the cortex. Our physiological reaction, this delicate chain of vibration, pulsation, displacement, conduction, that occurs in response to sound is what allows us to communicate, participate and enjoy music, and the sounds of the world that surrounds us. This design is so fascinating, and so intricate that a slight interruption along this pathway, either occurring at the peripheral or central level, can result in tremendous difficulty with hearing, understanding, or both.
Hearing and understanding are not always codependent. One must be able to hear to capture a spoken message, but hearing alone does not necessitate that the message was understood. The ability to understand an auditory signal ultimately depends on the brain’s capacity to receive and interpret a complete and synchronously fired neural message.

For many older adults who suffer from sensorineural hearing loss, damage to the peripheral auditory system passes incomplete messages to the brain. More than 50% of adults over age 65 have some degree of presbycusis or hearing loss in the higher frequencies. These adults often have difficulty hearing certain higher pitch sounds such as a bird chirpings , certain phones ringing and particular letters of the English alphabet. Because our alphabet is comprised of a combination of vowels, which are lower in frequency, and consonants which are higher in frequency, an individual with high frequency hearing loss, might remark that they can hear, (because they can indeed hear ) but they didn’t understand because they didn’t quite receive all of the information due to the brain’s inability to receive a complete message. In English, consonants envelop vowels to give meaning to speech and hearing only vowels and limited consonant sounds offer opportunities for misunderstanding. “Fifty” and “sixty” sound somewhat alike for someone with presbycusis, especially in noise.

Hearing aids offer tremendous help for most individuals with hearing loss by bringing the inaudible sounds into the range of audibility and offering the brain complete messages. Yet, there are individuals who have difficulty understanding, despite being able to hear. For some, damage to the auditory nerve results in its inability to fire synchronously, delivering an unclear signal to the brain. Some listeners with auditory nerve damage may have normal hearing (when it comes to detecting tones) but cannot interpret speech because the signal sounds distorted or unclear. For many who suffer from a lack of clarity, assistive listening devices in conjunction with aural rehabilitation often result in tremendous improvements in listening.
If you or a loved one has difficulty hearing OR understanding , a hearing evaluation is a first step. There is help for most hearing loss. No one should suffer in silence. Schedule an appointment at an audiologist today.

Stefanie Wolf, Au.D.
 
Doctor of Audiology
Audiology of Nassau County
165 North Village Avenue
Suite #114
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
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